Currently we have completed 1-15 and are working on 16-18.

Life Science

Learning Targets

Learning Sub-Targets

1.

Measurement

  • I can tell the difference between an observation and an inference
  • I can correctly use a graduated cylinder, balance, and metric ruler to collect data in SI (metric units)

2.

Tables and Graphs

  • I can make graphs correctly
  • I can interpret (read for information) graphs to predict trends in data.

3.

Experiment

 

  • I can distinguish (tell the difference) between qualitative and quantitative data.
  • I can develop (write) a hypothesis, procedure and conclusion based upon the scientific method.
  • I can identify (find and make a list) sources of experimental error in an experiment and explain the need for repeated trials.
  • I can follow the steps of experimental design to make an experiment that uses tools to collect quantitative data.

4.

Variables

 

  • I can identify (find and make a list) variables (independent and dependent) in an experiment.
  • I can identify (find and make a list) constants in an experiment and explain why they are needed.
  • I can identify (find and make a list) the control in an experiment and explain why it is needed.

5.

Cell Theory

 

  • I can identify (find and make a list) and describe the contributions (how a person helped to do a task) of scientists who have studied cells and in the development (making) of the cell theory: Francesco Redi, Robert Hooke, Anton van Leeuwenhoek, Matthias Schleiden, Theodor Schwan, Rudolf Virchow
  • I can identify (find and make a list) the three parts of the cell theory.
  • I can correctly use a microscope to look at slides using all powers.
  • I can explain how the use of microscopes, and improvements in microscopes, helped in the development (making) of the cell theory.

6.

Cell Structure

 

 

  • I can identify (find and make a list) and describe the function (job) of these cell organelles: Cell membrane, Cytoplasm, Nucleus, Cell wall, Vacuole, Mitochondrion, Endoplasmic reticulum, Chloroplast
  • I can distinguish (tell the difference) between plant and animal cells in descriptions, pictures and slides.

7.

Cellular Organization

  • I can explain the relationship (what one has to do with the other) among cells, tissue, organs, organ systems and organisms.
  • I can differentiate (explain how they are different) between unicellular and multicellular organisms
  • I can explain how the structure of a cell assists with the function of the cell

8.

Cellular Transportation

  • I can model (show how) how materials move into and out of cells in the process of osmosis, diffusion, active and passive transport
  • I can explain selective permeability and the cell membrane’s role in moving materials into and out of cells

9.

Photosynthesis

  • I can explain the process of photosynthesis by listing the reactants (what is needed) and the products (what is produced) and identify (find and make a list) the organelles used in photosynthesis
  • I can explain the process of cellular respiration by listing the reactants (what is needed) and the products (what is produced) and identify (find and make a list) the organelles used in cellular respiration
  • I can compare and contrast (tell how they are the same and different) photosynthesis and cellular respiration
  • I can explain the importance of photosynthesis as it relates (what it has to do with) to animals and food webs

10.

Cell Division

  • I can sequence (put in order) the stages of the cell cycle using words and diagrams.
  • I can sequence (put in order) the stages of the mitosis using words and diagrams.
  • I can differentiate (explain how they are different) between mitosis and meiosis and explain the purpose of each process.

11.

DNA

  • I can explain the structure (shape) and function (job) of DNA
  • I can explain the relationship (what one has to do with the other) between DNA, and chromosomes.
  • Key historic people in the understanding of DNA (Rosalind Franklin, Crick, Watson)

12.

Heredity

  • I can explain who Gregor Mendel is and his contributions (what he did) to genetics
  • I can differentiate (explain how they are different) between traits that can be inherited and traits that cannot be inherited.
  • I can explain what genetic engineering is and list practical applications (ways something is used) of genetic engineering.

13.

Punnett Squares

  • I can use a Punnett square to predict (figure out) possible results of a single trait cross.
  • I can distinguish (tell the difference) between dominant and recessive traits.
  • I can distinguish (tell the difference) between genotype and phenotype.

14.

Evidence of Evolution

  • I can explain who Charles Darwin was and where he traveled
  • I can describe Darwin’s observations about how some of the organisms he saw were similar yet different from one another
  • I can describe the difference between radioactive dating and relative dating
  • I can describe evidence that supports the theory of evolution (DNA, embryological, homologous structures, vestigial structures)
  • I can describe what fossils are and how they support evolution

15.

Mechanisms of Evolution

  • I can define adaptation
  • I can define natural selection
  • I can define variation in traits and give an example of a negative variation
  • I can explain how sexual reproduction increases variation
  • I can define a genetic mutation and explain how mutations increase variation
  • I can define extinction
  • I can explain how natural selection leads to evolution

16.

Characteristics of Life

  • I can identify and explain the processes needed for a cell to carry out life functions (jobs)
  • I can identify and explain the processes needed for a living organism to survive
  • I can explain how life functions are divided differently in multicellular organisms than in unicellular organisms
  • I can list the basic needs of plants and animals

17.

Classification System

  • I can explain early systems of classification created by (Aristotle & Linneaus)
  • I can explain the classification system used today
  • I can list the levels of classification in order from least specific to most specific
  • I can define a species
  • I can describe the importance of binomial nomenclature
  • I can explain the two classification levels that are used in a scientific name and write or type the name correctly
  • I can use a dichotomous key to identify an organism
  • I can make a dichotomous key to identify organisms

18.

6 Kingdoms

  • I can list the six kingdoms and explain how organisms are grouped into a kingdom
  • I can explain how the kingdoms are grouped into domains
  • I can list the characteristics of the following Classification categories; Archaebacteria, Eubacteria, Protists, Fungi, Plants (and each division), Animals including examples of each of the major animal phyla

19.

Ecosystems Vs. Biomes

  • I can define an ecosystem
  • I can define biotic and abiotic
  • I can define and list biotic and abiotic factors in an ecosystem
  • I can define a biome
  • I can define what climate is
  • I can identify what two factors determine climate
  • I can explain the difference between climate and weather

20.

Characteristics of Biomes

  • I can list the major biomes (Tundra, Northern Coniferous Forest, Deciduous Forest, Grasslands, Desert, Tropical Rainforest, Marine, and Fresh Water)
  • I can describe the climate, soil and organisms that belong to each terrestrial biome
  • I can describe the adaptations that help organisms survive in a specific ecosystem and biome
  • I can identify the biome I live in

21.

Energy Flow in Ecosystems

  • I can define and give an example of biotic groupings: organism, population, community and ecosystem
  • I can explain the difference between habitat and niche
  • I can explain what an energy pyramid illustrates and place organisms into their correct levels (decomposer, producer, first second and third level consumers)
  • I can illustrate the relationship of organisms in a food web and food chain
  • I can describe the predator prey relationship

22.

Ecosystem Dynamics

  • I can explain and label parts of the cycles in nature (water, carbon, nitrogen)
  • I can identify limiting factors in a population
  • I can explain competition, cooperation, social hierarchy and territorial imperative as they relate to biological communities
  • I can describe phototropism, hibernation and migration
  • I can explain how ecosystems are dynamic and changes “ripple” through ecosystems
  • I can list examples of symbiotic relationships (mutualism, commensalism and parasitism)

23.

Human Impact

  • I can explain that humans are a natural part of the ecosystem and that we depend on the ecosystem to meet basic needs
  • I can identify and explain the three main environmental issues: resource use, population growth and pollution
  • I can explain how humans influence food production and harvest with the choice of what to eat, fertilizer and pesticide use and turning farms into houses and shops
  • I can explain how humans change the size, quality and structure of habitats by using the land and natural resources
  • I can explain how human activities and natural disturbances impact populations (eutrophication, climate change and catastrophic disturbances)
  • I can explain how exotic/invasive species hurt native species and give two examples found in Virginia
  • I can explain some changes that humans are making to reduce our impact on the environment

24.

Professionalism in Science

(Ongoing target for literacy)

  • I can use details from the text or data as support when analyzing
  • I can write in complete sentences and use correct usage and mechanics
  • I can respond to and interact with my audience appropriately and with relevant information
  • I can give oral presentations using skills such as, but not limited to: proper eye contact, clear pronunciation, appropriate volume, and related graphics

Key SOL Vocabulary:



abiotic

active transport

adaptation

allele

anaphase

aquatic

autotroph

binomial nomenclature

biome

biotic

camouflage

cell membrane

cell plate

cell wall

cellular respiration

cellular transport

cellulose

chlorophyll

chloroplast

chromosome

class

climate

climate change

commensalism

community

coniferous

cytokinesis

cytoplasm

daughter cells

deciduous

diffusion

diploid

diversity

divisions

DNA

dominant

double helix

ecosystem

embryology

endoplasmic reticulum

energy

energy transfer

equilibrium

eukaryote

evolution

excretion

exotic/invasive species

extinction

family

food webs/chains

fossil

freshwater

gametes

gene

generation

genotype

genus

habitat

haploid

heredity

heterotroph

heterozygous

hibernation

hierarchy

homeostasis

homologous structures

homozygous

hybrid

inheritance/inherited

interphase

kingdom

marine

meiosis

metabolism

metaphase

migration

mimicry

mitosis

moss

multicellular

mutation

mutualism

natural selection

niche

nucleus

offspring

order

organ system

organelles

organism

organs

osmosis

parasitism

parent cell

passive transport

permafrost

phenotype

photosynthesis

phylum (phyla)

population

probability

producer

products

prokaryote

prophase

purebred

radioactive

raw materials

recessive

somatic cells

Species

spindle fibers

stimulus

succession

symbiosis

taxonomy

telophase

terrestrial

tissue

trait

transformation

unicellular

vacuole

vestigial structures